Editorial Advisory Board

George D. Lundberg, MD
Editor in Chief

George D. Lundberg, MD, Editor-In-Chief, Chair of the Editorial Advisory Board, & Chief Medical Officer

In addition to serving as Editor-In-Chief for CollabRx, Dr. Lundberg is President and Chair of the Board of Directors of The Lundberg Institute, a Consulting Professor at Stanford University, and Editor at Large for Medscape from WebMD. Dr. Lundberg has more than 30 years combined experience as Editor in Chief of JAMA (The Journal of the American Medical Association), the 10 AMA specialty journals, AM News, Medscape, The Medscape Journal, e-Medicine from Web MD, and MedPage Today from Everyday Health. A frequent lecturer, radio and television guest, and a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, the Industry Standard dubbed Dr. Lundberg “Online Healthcare’s Medicine Man” in 2000. Prior to CollabRx, Dr. Lundberg served as the President of the American Society for Clinical Pathology, Professor of Pathology and Associate Director of Laboratories at the Los Angeles County/USC Medical Center for 10 years, and for 5 years was the Professor and Chair of Pathology at the University of California, Davis. He served in the US Army during the Vietnam War, leaving as a lieutenant colonel after 11 years. Prior to his military service , Dr. Lundberg completed a clinical internship in Hawaii and a pathology residency in San Antonio. Called the medical Internet “pioneer” in 1995, Dr. Lundberg holds earned and honorary degrees from North Park College, Baylor University, the University of Alabama (Birmingham and Tuscaloosa), the State University of New York, Syracuse, Thomas Jefferson University and the Medical College of Ohio. Dr. Lundberg has worked in tropical medicine in Central America and Forensic Medicine in New York, Sweden, and England. His major professional interests are toxicology, violence, communication, physician behavior, patient safety, and health system reform.


Fred Appelbaum, MD

Fred Appelbaum, MD

Frederick R. Appelbaum, MD, is Director of the Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Head of Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, and President and Executive Director of the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. He is a diplomat on the American Boards of Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology, and is past chair of the Board of Scientific Advisors of the National Cancer Institute. Additionally, he has been a board member of a number of scientific societies, including the American Society of Hematology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and is Chair of the Leukemia Committee of the Southwest Oncology Group. Dr. Appelbaum served two terms as Associate Editor for Blood and also serves on the Editorial Boards of numerous scientific journals. Dr. Appelbaum is Head of the Clinical Transplant Research Program in the FHCRC/University of Washington Cancer Consortium and Principal Investigator on several National Institutes of Health grants. He is the author of over 800 scientific articles and was the lead author on the first paper to describe the successful use of autologous marrow transplantation. Dr. Appelbaum’s current areas of research interests center on the biology and treatment of hematologic malignancies.


Tanios Bekaii-Saab, MD

Tanios Bekaii-Saab, MD

Tanios Bekaii-Saab, MD, is the section chief for the gastrointestinal oncology program and the chair for the Gastrointestinal Disease-Specific Research Group at the OSUCCC – James. In Ohio State’s College of Medicine, he is a tenured associate professor in the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, and in the Department of Pharmacology. Bekaii-Saab’s research focuses on drug development and experimental therapeutics as pertaining to gastrointestinal malignancies. He is the principal investigator on numerous clinical trials, including studies supported by grants from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and various industry partners. He has authored multiple publications in high-impact scientific journals, including Journal of Clinical Oncology, Annals of Oncology, Clinical Cancer Research amongst others. He has presented his research at multiple national and international forums. He is also on the editorial board for the Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network and has received numerous leadership awards from various organizations such as NCI and ASCO. He is one of the “Best Doctors in America” as well as a “Top Castle Connolly Doctor”.

Dr. Bekaii-Saab earned his medical degree at the American University of Beirut in Lebanon, did his residency in internal medicine at the Indiana University Medical Center in Indianapolis, and completed fellowships in hematology/oncology and in clinical pharmacology at Tufts University-New England Medical Center in Boston. He joined Ohio State’s medical faculty in 2002.


Douglas Blayney, MD

Douglas Blayney, MD

Douglas W. Blayney, MD is the Ann and John Doerr Medical Director of the Stanford University Cancer Center and a Professor of Internal Medicine. He is immediate past president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). He came to Stanford after seven years in a similar position at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor; previously he was with Wilshire Oncology Medical Group in Pasadena, California, where he practiced for 17 years. Dr. Blayney has served on the FDA’s Oncology Drug Advisory Committee, as founding editor-in-chief of ASCO’s Journal of Oncology Practice, and was a founder of ASCO’s internet site, www.asco.org. He has authored or co-authored over fifty peer reviewed journal articles, and co-edited one book. His current research involves measuring and improving quality of cancer care using information technology. Dr. Blayney received a degree in electrical engineering from Stanford and went on to the University of California, San Diego, from which he received his medical degree in 1977, and was an intern and resident in internal medicine at their University of California Hospitals. He trained in oncology at the National Cancer Institute, and is board certified in internal medicine and medical oncology.


Arthur Caplan, PhD

Arthur Caplan, PhD

Arthur Caplan is the Emmanuel and Robert Hart Director of the Center for Bioethics and the Sidney D Caplan Professor of Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Prior to coming to Penn in 1994, Caplan taught at the University of Minnesota, the University of Pittsburgh, and Columbia University. He was the Associate Director of the Hastings Center from 1984-1987. Caplan is the author or editor of twenty-nine books and over 500 papers in refereed journals. His most recent books are Smart Mice Not So Smart People (Rowman Littlefield, 2006) and the Penn Guide to Bioethics (Springer, 2009). He has served on a number of national and international committees including as the Chair, National Cancer Institute Biobanking Ethics Working Group; the Chair of the Advisory Committee to the United Nations on Human Cloning; the Chair of the Advisory Committee to the Department of Health and Human Services on Blood Safety and Availability; a member of the Presidential Advisory Committee on Gulf War Illnesses; the special advisory committee to the International Olympic Committee on genetics and gene therapy; the ethics committee of the American Society of Gene Therapy; chair of the advisory committee on bioethics for GlaxoSmithKline and the special advisory panel to the National Institutes of Mental Health on human experimentation on vulnerable subjects. And most recently was the Co-Director of the Joint Council of Europe/United Nations Study on Trafficking in Organs and Body Parts.


Susan Cohn, MD

Susan Cohn, MD

Susan L. Cohn, MD, is a highly respected expert in pediatric cancers and blood diseases. She is a leading authority on neuroblastoma, a cancer of nerve cells, and the most common type of cancer found in infants. Dr. Cohn is actively researching several aspects of neuroblastoma. She is one of the few pediatric oncologists in the United States who is conducting Phase I clinical trials of promising treatments for the disease. Her research has received generous support from the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.


E. David Crawford, MD

E. David Crawford, MD

E. David Crawford is the distinguished Professor of Surgery, Urology, and Radiation Oncology, the Head of the Section of Urologic Oncology at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Chairman of the Prostate Conditions Education Council and founder of Bingham International Center for the 3D Diagnosis and Treatment of Prostate Cancer. Dr. Crawford received his medical degree from the University of Cincinnati. His postgraduate training included an internship and residency in urology at the Good Samaritan Hospital in Cincinnati. He completed a genitourinary cancer fellowship at the University of California Medical Center in Los Angeles. Dr. Crawford is an internationally-recognized expert in benign prostate hypertrophy, urologic cancers, and, in particular, prostate cancer. The recipient of more than 69 research grants, he has conducted research in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer, metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate, hormone refractory prostate cancer, and other areas of urological infections and malignancies. He has authored or coauthored more than 450 articles in such journals as Urology, The New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of Urology and the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. He has published five textbooks and authored more than 50 book chapters, and is an editorial reviewer or consultant for Urology, Journal of Urology, The New England Journal of Medicine, Cancer and the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Crawford is an active member of many national and international organizations, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Urological Association (AUA) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Crawfords involvement in the national prostate cancer arena has been widely recognized and he has received many honors and awards, including a Freddie Award at the AMA International Health and Medical Film Competition for the program ITV: The Cutting Edge Medical Report (Prostate Cancer: Understanding, Diagnosing, and Defeating). He has been recognized as one of the Best Doctors in America, one of the Best Cancer Doctors, one of the Top 20 Urologists in the Country and was selected as the Best Healthcare Provider in the Denver Metro region.


George Demetri, MD

George Demetri, MD

Dr. George Demetri received an undergraduate degree in Biochemistry from Harvard University, followed by a Rotary Foundation Fellowship to do research at the Université de Besancon, France, after which he received his medical degree from Stanford University School of Medicine, California, USA. After completing Internal Medicine residency and chief residency at the University of Washington Hospitals in Seattle, Washington, he pursued a fellowship in Medical Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) and Harvard Medical School, where he has served as an attending physician since 1989. Dr. Demetri and colleagues at Harvard have developed a large research-focused multidisciplinary center of excellence for sarcoma patients at the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center, supporting a number of translational and clinical research projects in sarcomas and focusing on new drug development. Dr. Demetri’s research and clinical interests have focused on mechanism-based drug development for solid tumors, with a particular emphasis on molecularly-defined subsets of sarcomas such as Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST). Work from the multidisciplinary team at Dana-Farber/Harvard has contributed to the development of several new drugs for sarcomas and other malignancies, including imatinib (Gleevec), sunitinib (Sutent), dasatinib (Sprycel), trabectedin (Yondelis) and other new targeted therapies in development. Dr Demetri serves as co-chair of the Medical Advisory Board for the Sarcoma Foundation of America as well as several scientific and editorial advisory boards. With an interest in internet-based patient support, he also serves on the Medical Advisory Board of CancerNet (www.cancer.net) from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.


Laura Esserman, MD, MBA

Laura Esserman, MD, MBA

Dr. Laura Esserman is a breast surgeon and Director of the Breast Care Center. She specialized in breast cancer research and treatment because she saw great opportunities to advance our knowledge and treatment of breast cancer and to make a meaningful difference in the lives of women who have breast disease. Her overall vision as demonstrated by such initiatives as a healing garden, an art therapy program for patients, and a same day assessment program is to develop state-of-the-art ways to care for and empower patients during their treatment. Dr. Esserman received her undergraduate degree from Harvard, and her medical and surgical training from Stanford University. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship in breast oncology at Stanford in 1988, and received an MBA from Stanford Graduate School of Business in 1993. She joined the UCSF faculty in 1993. Dr. Esserman has received many honors for her work, a grant to establish a state-of-the-art breast center and breast cancer research foundation-one of three major Department of Defense grants awarded to in the United States in 1998. She is also the Clinical director of the Breast Oncology research program at UCSF.


David Fisher, MD

David Fisher, MD

Dr. Fisher is chief of the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Dermatology at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts (USA). He also serves as director of the MGH Cutaneous Biology Research Center and director of the Melanoma Center at MGH. Fisher’s research has focused on understanding the molecular and genetic events which underlie formation of melanoma as well as skin pigmentation. As a clinician, he has worked to translate these understandings into advances in diagnosis, treatment and prevention of human diseases related to the skin and associated disorders. A graduate of Swarthmore College with a degree in Biology and Chemistry, Fisher is also a concert cellist and graduated from the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. He received his PhD under doctors Henry Kunkel and Gunter Blobel at Rockefeller University and his Medical Degree at Cornell University Medical College. He carried out post-doctoral training with Dr. Phillip Sharp at MIT. Fisher’s specialty training in Medicine, Pediatrics, and Oncology were carried out at Harvard Medical School. He currently is the president of the Society for Melanoma Research.


Keith Flaherty, MD

Keith Flaherty, MD

Dr. Flaherty received a Bachelor of Science from Yale University and medical degree from Johns Hopkins University. He trained in internal medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and completed a fellowship in medical oncology at the University of Pennsylvania. He joined the faculty in the School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania as an Assistant Professor of Medicine and member of the Developmental Therapeutics Program in the Abramson Cancer Center in 2002. In 2009, Dr. Flaherty moved to Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School to serve as the Director of Developmental Therapeutics for the MGH Cancer Center. He was awarded a K23 grant from the NCI to investigate the inhibition of angiogenesis with targeted therapy combinations in melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. In addition to being principal investigator of numerous first-in-human clinical trials with novel targeted therapies, he is the principal investigator of two national, cooperative group trials: E2603, a phase III trial comparing sorafenib, carboplatin and paclitaxel to carboplatin and paclitaxel alone in patients with metastatic melanoma and E2804, a randomized phase II trial comparing combinations of anti-angiogenic agents in metastatic renal cell carcinoma. He served as principal investigator for the first-in-human clinical trials of the first prospectively developed selective BRAF inhibitors, RAF-265 and Zelboraf. Zelboraf has emerged as the most active single-agent therapy ever evaluated in metastatic melanoma patients, and is rapidly being tested in a phase III trial of which Dr. Flaherty serves as co-principal investigator. He is internationally known for expertise in clinical and translational research directed against signal transduction pathways in melanoma.


Erica Frank, MD

Erica Frank, MD

Dr. Erica Frank is a Professor in the School of Population and Public Health at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, and a Tier I Canada Research Chair. She is also the Founder and Principal Investigator of the Healthy Doc = Healthy Patient initiative (delineating and building on the relationship between physicians’ personal and clinical practices), Founder and Director of Health Sciences Online (www.hso.info, creating a global virtual health sciences university), and Past President of Physicians for Social Responsibility.


Scott Gottlieb, MD

Scott Gottlieb, MD

Scott Gottlieb, MD is a practicing physician and Resident Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. From 2005-2007, Dr. Gottlieb served as FDA Deputy Commissioner and before that, from 2003-2004, as a senior advisor to the FDA Commissioner and as the FDA’s Director of Medical Policy Development. He left FDA in the spring of 2004 to work on implementation of the new Medicare Drug Benefit as a Senior Adviser to the Administrator of Medicare and Medicaid Services, where he supported the agency’s work on quality improvement and coverage and payment decision-making, particularly related to new medical technologies. Dr. Gottlieb is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Brain Health Institute at Rutgers University. He is a Director of Molecular Insights (MIPI) a radiotherapy and cancer diagnostics company; and CombiMatrix (CBMX) a medical diagnostics company focused on gene profiling and cancer diagnostics. Dr. Gottlieb is partner to a healthcare investment firm and continues to practice medicine as a hospitalist. He completed a residency in internal medicine at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City and is a graduate of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine and of Wesleyan University, in Middletown, Connecticut.


Sarah Greene

Sarah Greene

Sarah Greene is Executive Director of Cancer Commons, a nonprofit whose mission is to advance and report the latest precision therapies to patients through Rapid Lear ning Communities involving patients, researchers and physicians. Most recently she was editor-in-chief of The Scientist magazine and its parent, Faculty of 1000, a post-publication peer review service in London. She is a publishing and new media entrepreneur with three startups acquired by Wiley (Current Protocols), Elsevier (HMS Beagle web magazine and BioMedNet), and Thomson Reuters (Praxis.MD; Best Practice of Medicine). She was a co-founder of the Society for Participatory Medicine and launched the Journal of Participatory Medicine as managing editor. Greene also developed websites with original content and formats for the New York Academy of Sciences (eBriefingsScience & the Cityand The New York Times-Health, and was chief content officer at Keas, Inc. She trained as a soil microbiologist and puts this to good use at her family farm in Nebraska.  Her website is http://sarahgreene.net.


Matthew Holt

Matthew Holt

Matthew Holt has spent about 20 years in health care as a researcher, generalist forecaster, and strategist. He’s conducted in-depth studies about the health care market, information technology and policy for public release and private clients. He learned from some of the best in forecasting, policy and survey organizations, like Institute for the Future and Harris Interactive. But these days he’s best known as the author of The Health Care Blog and as the co-founder of the Health2.0 Conference. For that he’s been mostly self-taught!


Donald Kennedy, PhD

Donald Kennedy, PhD

Donald Kennedy is President Emeritus and Bing Professor of Environmental Science and Policy, Emeritus at Stanford University. He is also a Senior Fellow of the Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies and the Wood Institute for the Environment, and is a member of the Food Security and Environment Program in both Institutes. Dr. Kennedy was editor-in-chief of Science (2000-2008) and also served as Commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration during the Carter administration. Dr. Kennedy is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. He served on the National Commission for Public Service and the Carnegie Commission on Science, Technology and Government, and is a founding director of the Health Effects Institute. He currently serves as a director of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and as co-chair of the National Academies’ Project on Science, Technology and Law. Dr. Kennedy received A.B. and PhD degrees in biology from Harvard University.


Razelle Kurzrock, MD

Razelle Kurzrock, MD

Dr. Razelle Kurzrock is known for developing one of the largest and best phase 1 clinical trials programs in the nation while at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. A central theme of that program was the personalized medicine strategy, embodied in a protocol called PREDICT for Profile-related Evidence Determining Individualized Cancer Therapy. This approach utilized advanced molecular technologies to match patients with targeted cancer treatment that optimized chances for response.

At Moores Cancer Center, Dr. Kurzrock’s charge is broad, including not just growing and innovating the Center’s clinical trials program, but also heading its newly established Center for Personalized Therapy. As a physician-scientist, she brings extraordinary expertise and experience in clinical research, business operations, regulatory operations, financial and budget planning, and administrative oversight, in addition to her world-recognized work in translational science. Dr. Kurzrock is also Vice Chief of the Hematology-Oncology Division in the UC San Diego School of Medicine.

Dr. Kurzrock received her MD degree from the University of Toronto and has about 450 peer-reviewed publications and a uniquely strong record of competitive grant funding within the setting of phase I program building. She has been the principal investigator of the National Cancer Institute U01 Phase I Studies of Targeted Anti-Cancer Agents.


Frank McCormick, PhD, FRS

Frank McCormick, PhD, FRS

Frank McCormick, PhD, F.R.S., D.Sc. (Hon) is the Director of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, a multidisciplinary research and clinical care organization that is one of the largest cancer centers in the Western United States, and he is Associate Dean of the UCSF School of Medicine. A native of Cambridge, England, Dr. McCormick received his B.Sc. in biochemistry from the University of Birmingham (1972) and his PhD in biochemistry from the University of Cambridge (1975). Postdoctoral fellowships were held in the United States at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and in London at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund. He has been a Fellow of the Royal Society since 1996. Prior to joining the UCSF faculty, Dr. McCormick pursued cancer-related work with several Bay Area biotechnology firms, including positions with Cetus Corporation (Director of Molecular Biology, 1981-90; Vice President of Research, 1990-91) and Chiron Corporation, where he was Vice President of Research from 1991-92. In 1992 he founded Onyx Pharmaceuticals and served as its Chief Scientific Officer until 1996. Dr. McCormicks current research interests center on the fundamental differences between normal cells and cancer cells that can allow the development of novel therapeutic strategies. In addition to his positions as Director of the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Associate Dean of the UCSF School of Medicine, he holds the E. Dixon Heise Distinguished Professorship in Oncology and the David A. Wood Distinguished Professorship of Tumor Biology and Cancer Research in UCSFs Department of Microbiology and Immunology. Dr. McCormick is the author of more than 270 scientific publications.


David G. Nathan, MD

David G. Nathan, MD

David Nathan is President Emeritus of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, which provides patient care in addition to conducting research. He was president of DFCI from 1995 to 2000. Dr. Nathan chaired the Department of Pediatrics and served as physician-in-chief of Children’s Hospital in Boston from 1985 to 1995. He was chief of hematology and oncology at CHB and DFCI after serving as chief of hematology at CHB between 1967 and 1984. Dr. Nathan was senior resident in medicine at the then Peter Bent Brigham Hospital and clinical associate at the National Cancer Institute from 1959 to 1966. His textbook, titled Hematology of Infancy and Childhood, is the leading text in the field. He is the author of two popular books: Genes, Blood and Courage and The Cancer Treatment Revolution: How Smart Drugs and Other New Therapies Are Renewing Our Hope and Changing the Face of Medicine. Dr. Nathan is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, the American Pediatric Society, the Institute of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the National Medal of Science, the Stratton medal of the American Society of Hematology, the Walker Prize of the Boston Museum of Science, the John Howland Medal of the American Pediatric Society, and the George M. Kober Medal of the Association of American Physicians. He is one of only three physicians to receive both the Howland and Kober medals.


Stuart L. Nightingale, M.D.

Stuart L. Nightingale, M.D.

Stuart L. Nightingale, M.D. is an independent consultant on public health, science, and regulatory affairs. He has served as a consultant/contractor in the Office of Biotechnology Activities in the NIH Office of Science Policy in the Office of the Director since retiring from the Federal government in 2007.  His Federal service included senior management positions in the Office of the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Executive Office of the President.  At the time he retired Dr. Nightingale was the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response and Senior Medical Advisor to the Director, Office of Global Health Affairs).   At FDA he was Associate Commissioner for Health Affairs and earlier Assistant to the Director, Bureau of Drugs (now CDER).   Dr. Nightingale has served on a number of Editorial Boards and was the editor of the “From the FDA” monthly column in the Journal of the American Medical Association.  His publications have focused on the treatment use of investigational drugs and biologics, the use of FDA-approved products “off label,” prescription drug information for patients, Direct-to-Consumer advertising of FDA- approved products, and cancer quackery.  He received the Presidential Meritorious Executive Rank Award on two occasions and the Surgeon General Exemplary Award.  He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians, the Medical Administrators Conference, and the Senior Executives Association. He is a manuscript reviewer for several medical, scientific, and public health journals.

Dr. Nightingale graduated from Yale University and the New York University School of Medicine. His training in Internal Medicine was at Montefiore Hospital and Medical Center in New York. He served on the faculties of the State University of New York (Downstate) Medical Center and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene


Ravi Salgia, MD, PhD

Ravi Salgia, MD, PhD

Ravi Salgia, MD, PhD, is the City of Hope Professor and Chair in the Department of Medical Oncology and Therapeutics Research. He is the Arthur & Rosalie Kaplan Endowed Chair in Medical Oncology and Associate Director of Clinical Services. Dr. Salgia was a tenured professor of medicine, pathology and dermatology, and the Director of the Thoracic Oncology Program, and Aerodigestive Tract Program Translational Research Lab in the Section of Hematology/Oncology at the University of Chicago Medical Center in Illinois. Dr Salgia was also an attending physician in the Department of Medicine, Section of Hematology/Oncology, University of Chicago. Dr Salgia is a member of the American Society of Hematology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Association for Cancer Research, and International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, among others. He was also a member of the Committee on Cancer Biology and Clinical Trials Review Committee at the University of Chicago. Dr Salgia’s research interests focus on novel therapeutics against lung cancer. He has been an invited lecturer to more than 300 symposia and seminars. Dr Salgia has been honored with numerous awards, including recently being named one of the Top Doctors in America. Dr Salgia is a member of the editorial board for the Journal of Carcinogenesis, Update on Cancer Therapeutics, and Current Women’s Health Reviews. He also serves as associate editor for the Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology, and Oncology. He has authored or coauthored more than 100 peer-reviewed publications, 125 abstracts, and 30 book chapters. Dr Salgia earned a medical degree from Loyola University School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois, where he also obtained a doctorate of philosophy. He did his internship/residency in Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He also did his Medical Oncology Fellowship at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School. He was on faculty at the DFCI for a decade before moving to the University of Chicago.


Jared Schwartz, MD, PhD

Jared Schwartz, MD, PhD

Jared Schwartz has over 30 years of pathology expertise, and currently serves as CMO of Aperio. Prior to Aperio, Dr. Schwartz was President of the College of American Pathologists, and Director of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Presbyterian Healthcare in Charlotte, North Carolina. Board certified in anatomic and clinical pathology with subspecialty boards in medical microbiology and cytopathology, he is a graduate of Duke University Medical School, where he completed his residency and fellowship training, and served as chief resident. He was appointed to the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee by HHS, and was a co-chair and author of the ASCO/CAP Guidelines on HER2, which was published in the January 2007 editions of the Journal of Clinical Oncology and Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. He is one of the authors of the ASCO/CAP Guidelines on ER/PR, which was published in both journals in April 2010.


Tom Stossel, MD

Tom Stossel, MD

Thomas Stossel, a graduate of Princeton and Harvard Universities, is Director of Translational Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (http://translationalmedicine.bwh.harvard.edu/) and American Cancer Society Professor at Harvard. He was President of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and American Society of Hematology and edited the Journal of Clinical Investigation. For his research on cell motility he was elected to The National Academy of Sciences, The American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and The Institute of Medicine. His policy interest concerns physician-industry collaboration, and he is a co-founder of the Association of Clinical Researchers and Educators. He is a founder of Critical Biologics Corporation (http://www.criticalbiologics.com/) and has licensed patented technology to Velico Medical, Inc. With his wife, Dr Kerry Maguire, Stossel does dental and medical work in rural Zambia (http://optionsforchildren.org/default.htm).


Margaret Tempero, MD

Margaret Tempero, MD

Dr. Tempero is Deputy Director and Director of Research Programs and leads the Pancreas Cancer Program at the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center (HDFCCC). Her research career has focused on pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma especially in the area of investigational therapeutics. She was a pioneer in the use of antibody-based therapies and helped develop the fixed dose rate concept for gemcitabine. Her group has developed effective gemcitabine combinations and provided a foundation for using CA19-9 as a surrogate for survival in clinical trials. Currently her group is assessing molecular subtypes and molecular enrichment for selecting new drugs for clinical evaluation.Dr. Tempero directed the first GI SPORE devoted to pancreatic cancer when she was on the faculty of the University of Nebraska and subsequently led the NCI funded U54 Molecular Target Assessment Team at UCSF. She also organized the first Pancreas Cancer Think Tank in 1999 and co-led the NCI sponsored Progress Review Group on Pancreatic Cancer in 2000. She has served as the Chair of the NCCN Guidelines Panel on Pancreatic Cancer since 2000. She also serves on the Pancreatic Cancer Task Force for the NCI intergroup and recently co-organized the State of the Science meeting on pancreatic cancer at the NCI.Dr. Tempero also has extensive experience in scientific review and administration, training and oversight. She co-directed the AACR/ASCO Methods in Clinical Cancer Research in Vail for 3 years and spent 9 years of service teaching at this course and in similar courses in Europe and Australia. She was founding Chair of the NCI Clinical Oncology Study Section (CONC) and served as a member and Chair (2-year term) of the NCI Board of Scientific Counselors Subcommittee A. She is on the External Advisory Boards of the Pancreas SPORE at MDACC and the GI SPORE at the University of Arizona. She is, or has been, on the Scientific Advisory Boards of the Lustgarten Foundation, the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, the V Foundation, The Alberta Canada Cancer Board and the EORTC. She has held many appointments at AACR and ASCO and has served as a member of the ASCO Board of Directors and as ASCO President in 2004. She is currently a member of the Oncology Drug Advisory Committee for the FDA. She served as Deputy Director and Interim Director for the UNMC Eppley Cancer Center until 1999 and is Chief Emeritus of the Division of Medical Oncology at UCSF (2000 – 2007).


Laura Van ‘t Veer, PhD

Laura Van ‘t Veer, PhD

Laura van ‘t Veer received her M.Sc. degree in Biology (1984) at the University of Amsterdam and a PhD in Medicine (1989) at the University of Leiden, The Netherlands. She did her postdoctoral training at the Cancer Center of the Harvard Medical School and The Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA (1989-1991) and The Netherlands Cancer Institute (1992-1993). From 1993 till 2007 she initiated and held the positions of Head Molecular Pathology and Head Genetic Counseling Clinic at the Netherlands Cancer Institute. In 2003 she was one of the founders of the Netherlands Cancer Institute spin-off, the molecular profiling company Agendia. In 2007-2010 she became Division Head Diagnostic Oncology, including clinical operations and research of 5 clinical departments. Since 2010 she is Professor at the University of California San Francisco, where she leads the Breast Oncology Program. Dr. van ‘t Veer is first author of a study showing that microarray genomics technology can predict which breast tumors will likely metastasize and which will not (Nature 2002, NEJM 2002). When these findings are implemented into daily clinical practice, the amount of so-called adjuvant treatments with chemotherapy for (pre-menopausal) breast cancer patients could be reduced by up to thirty percent. This microarray test now called MammaPrint, is central to the work of the translational research network TRANSBIG (Translational Research Breast International Group). The MINDACT trial is worldwide the first large scale clinical trial implementing genomics. MammaPrint is an FDA cleared In Vitro Diagnostic Multigene Index Assay (IVDMIA), included in several international and national guidelines for breast cancer management. At UCSF she coordinates the tissue and biomarker activities of the FNIH sponsored multicenter adaptive clinical trial I-SPY. Dr. van ‘t Veer received for this work the 2007 European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) life-time achievement award for translational research in breast cancer.