Cancer Specific Editorial Boards

Breast Cancer

Hope Rugo, MD

Hope Rugo, MD, Breast Cancer Chief Advisor

Dr. Rugo graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1983. She completed a residency in internal medicine and primary care followed by a fellowship in hematology and oncology at the University of California San Francisco. She was a post-doctoral fellow in immunology participating in laboratory research at Stanford University from 1988-1990. In 1990, Dr. Rugo joined the faculty at UCSF in the Division of Hematology and Oncology. Dr. Rugo has been recognized for her excellence in both patient care and in teaching of both medical students and training physicians. She has received several awards including the Bank of America Gianini Foundation Award and a UCSF Clinical Cancer Center Investigator Research Program intramural award. In 2006, she was honored for her work in Breast Cancer Research by the Friends of the Breast Care Center.


Laura Esserman, MD, MBA

Laura Esserman, MD, MBA

Dr. Laura Esserman is a breast surgeon and Director of the Breast Care Center. She specialized in breast cancer research and treatment because she saw great opportunities to advance our knowledge and treatment of breast cancer and to make a meaningful difference in the lives of women who have breast disease. Her overall vision as demonstrated by such initiatives as a healing garden, an art therapy program for patients, and a same day assessment program is to develop state-of-the-art ways to care for and empower patients during their treatment. Dr. Esserman received her undergraduate degree from Harvard, and her medical and surgical training from Stanford University. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship in breast oncology at Stanford in 1988, and received an MBA from Stanford Graduate School of Business in 1993. She joined the UCSF faculty in 1993. Dr. Esserman has received many honors for her work, a grant to establish a state-of-the-art breast center and breast cancer research foundation-one of three major Department of Defense grants awarded to in the United States in 1998. She is also the Clinical director of the Breast Oncology research program at UCSF.


Laura Van ‘t Veer, PhD

Laura Van ‘t Veer, PhD

Laura van ‘t Veer received her M.Sc. degree in Biology (1984) at the University of Amsterdam and a PhD in Medicine (1989) at the University of Leiden, The Netherlands. She did her postdoctoral training at the Cancer Center of the Harvard Medical School and The Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA (1989-1991) and The Netherlands Cancer Institute (1992-1993). From 1993 till 2007 she initiated and held the positions of Head Molecular Pathology and Head Genetic Counseling Clinic at the Netherlands Cancer Institute. In 2003 she was one of the founders of the Netherlands Cancer Institute spin-off, the molecular profiling company Agendia. In 2007-2010 she became Division Head Diagnostic Oncology, including clinical operations and research of 5 clinical departments. Since 2010 she is Professor at the University of California San Francisco, where she leads the Breast Oncology Program. Dr. van ‘t Veer is first author of a study showing that microarray genomics technology can predict which breast tumors will likely metastasize and which will not (Nature 2002, NEJM 2002). When these findings are implemented into daily clinical practice, the amount of so-called adjuvant treatments with chemotherapy for (pre-menopausal) breast cancer patients could be reduced by up to thirty percent. This microarray test now called MammaPrint, is central to the work of the translational research network TRANSBIG (Translational Research Breast International Group). The MINDACT trial is worldwide the first large scale clinical trial implementing genomics. MammaPrint is an FDA cleared In Vitro Diagnostic Multigene Index Assay (IVDMIA), included in several international and national guidelines for breast cancer management. At UCSF she coordinates the tissue and biomarker activities of the FNIH sponsored multicenter adaptive clinical trial I-SPY. Dr. van ‘t Veer received for this work the 2007 European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) life-time achievement award for translational research in breast cancer.

Colorectal

Tanios Bekaii-Saab, MD

Tanios Bekaii-Saab, MD

Tanios Bekaii-Saab, MD, is the section chief for the gastrointestinal oncology program and the chair for the Gastrointestinal Disease-Specific Research Group at the OSUCCC – James. In Ohio State’s College of Medicine, he is a tenured associate professor in the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, and in the Department of Pharmacology. Bekaii-Saab’s research focuses on drug development and experimental therapeutics as pertaining to gastrointestinal malignancies. He is the principal investigator on numerous clinical trials, including studies supported by grants from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and various industry partners. He has authored multiple publications in high-impact scientific journals, including Journal of Clinical Oncology, Annals of Oncology, Clinical Cancer Research amongst others. He has presented his research at multiple national and international forums. He is also on the editorial board for the Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network and has received numerous leadership awards from various organizations such as NCI and ASCO. He is one of the “Best Doctors in America” as well as a “Top Castle Connolly Doctor”.

Dr. Bekaii-Saab earned his medical degree at the American University of Beirut in Lebanon, did his residency in internal medicine at the Indiana University Medical Center in Indianapolis, and completed fellowships in hematology/oncology and in clinical pharmacology at Tufts University-New England Medical Center in Boston. He joined Ohio State’s medical faculty in 2002.


Antonia R. Sepulveda, MD, PhD, FACP

Antonia R. Sepulveda, MD, PhD, FACP

Dr. Antonia Sepulveda is Vice-Chair for Translational Research and Director of the Division of Gastrointestinal Pathology in the Department of Pathology & Cell Biology at Columbia University. Dr. Sepulveda is an experienced gastrointestinal and molecular pathologist with expertise combining conventional morphology and novel molecular applications for tissue diagnosis. Her clinical expertise is focused in Gastrointestinal and Pancreaticobiliary Pathology and her Molecular Pathology expertise is centered in solid tumor genomic and epigenetic molecular testing. She has served as the Chair of the Solid Tumor Subdivision of the Association for Molecular Pathology. Dr. Sepulveda’s research laboratory and the pathology translational research program at Columbia University are integrating conventional diagnostics with novel molecular testing applications of molecular biomarkers, with emphasis in genomic and epigenetic approaches for evaluation of cancer risk, diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapies in digestive organ cancers and precursor lesions, including gastric, esophageal, colorectal and pancreaticobiliary tumors. Dr. Sepulveda has contributed numerous original research publications, reviews and chapters and is the Editor of a recently released book titled “Molecular Pathology of Neoplastic Gastrointestinal Diseases”.

Lung Cancer

Ravi Salgia, MD, PhD

Ravi Salgia, MD, PhD

Ravi Salgia, MD, PhD, is the City of Hope Professor and Chair in the Department of Medical Oncology and Therapeutics Research. He is the Arthur & Rosalie Kaplan Endowed Chair in Medical Oncology and Associate Director of Clinical Services. Dr. Salgia was a tenured professor of medicine, pathology and dermatology, and the Director of the Thoracic Oncology Program, and Aerodigestive Tract Program Translational Research Lab in the Section of Hematology/Oncology at the University of Chicago Medical Center in Illinois. Dr Salgia was also an attending physician in the Department of Medicine, Section of Hematology/Oncology, University of Chicago. Dr Salgia is a member of the American Society of Hematology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Association for Cancer Research, and International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, among others. He was also a member of the Committee on Cancer Biology and Clinical Trials Review Committee at the University of Chicago. Dr Salgia’s research interests focus on novel therapeutics against lung cancer. He has been an invited lecturer to more than 300 symposia and seminars. Dr Salgia has been honored with numerous awards, including recently being named one of the Top Doctors in America. Dr Salgia is a member of the editorial board for the Journal of Carcinogenesis, Update on Cancer Therapeutics, and Current Women’s Health Reviews. He also serves as associate editor for the Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology, and Oncology. He has authored or coauthored more than 100 peer-reviewed publications, 125 abstracts, and 30 book chapters. Dr Salgia earned a medical degree from Loyola University School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois, where he also obtained a doctorate of philosophy. He did his internship/residency in Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He also did his Medical Oncology Fellowship at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School. He was on faculty at the DFCI for a decade before moving to the University of Chicago.


Raphael Bueno, MD

Raphael Bueno, MD

Dr. Bueno is the Associate Chief of Thoracic Surgery at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and an Associate Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Bueno is a busy clinical surgeon with expertise in the surgical management of complex lung cancer. Dr. Bueno is also a funded investigator who has been working in the field of prognosis and diagnosis of thoracic malignancies. He has a particular interest in developing diagnostic and prognostic tests for patients with lung cancer. He has been a member of the Cancer and Leukemia Group B cooperative group for clinical and translational cancer research for the past decade and has participated in several multi-center research efforts through this and other organizations.



Nicholas Campbell, MD

Nicholas Campbell, MD

Dr. Nicholas Campbell earned his medical degree at the Medical College of Georgia. He then completed his residency in Internal Medicine and then fellowship in Medical Oncology both at the University of Chicago where he served as Chief Fellow. Dr. Campbell is now a Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Chicago teaching affiliate hospital, Northshore University. Dr. Campbell’s clinical research interests include novel therapeutics, trial development, and database management in Thoracic Oncology.


Sanja Dacic, MD, PhD

Sanja Dacic, MD, PhD

Sanja Dacic, MD, PhD, is associate professor of pathology and Director of FISH and Developmental Laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Dr Dacic received her medical degree and a doctor of philosophy degree with a thesis on the EGFR signaling pathway in lung carcinomas at the University of Zagreb, Croatia. She completed her residency training at the University of Pittsburgh and joined the faculty immediately after her fellowship in surgical pathology. She started her career in diagnostic pulmonary pathology and has been involved in many basic and translational research projects on molecular profiling of lung carcinomas that resulted in more than 100 peer-reviewed scientific articles and book chapters,. She is a member of the pathology committee for the International Association for Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) and a member of International Mesothelioma Panel. Dr. Dacic serves as a Deputy Chief Editor of the Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, and is the editorial board member for American Journal of Clinical Pathology and Advances in Anatomic Pathology. Dr. Dacic is a recipient of Arthur Purdy Stout Prize in 2011 for her research contributions that have had a major impact on diagnostic pathology.


Phillip Dennis, MD, PhD

Phillip Dennis, MD, PhD

Dr Phil Dennis is currently Chair, Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore, MD. Dr. Phillip Dennis attended the University of Virginia as an Echols Scholar and obtained his PhD and MD degrees from New York University as part of the Medical Scientist Training Program. Dr. Dennis completed training in Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology at Johns Hopkins and joined the NCI as a tenure track investigator in 1999. Since then, Dr. Dennis’ scientific and clinical interests have focused on studying signal transduction pathways that contribute to formation, maintenance, and therapeutic resistance of lung cancer. Dr. Dennis became a Senior Investigator in the Medical Oncology Branch in 2006. Dr. Dennis currently heads the Signal Transduction Section in the Medical Oncology Branch. Dr. Dennis is a recipient of the Alton Ochsner Award Relating Smoking and Health and an NIH Merit Award, and was elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation in 2007.


Gregory Otterson, MD

Gregory Otterson, MD

Dr. Otterson is Professor in the College of Medicine at The Ohio State University James Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Otterson is broadly interested in improving the care and understanding of thoracic malignancies (adenocarcinoma, squamous carcinoma, large cell carcinoma, never-smoking adenocarcinoma, small cell lung cancer, mesothelioma and thymic cancers). His research centers around the genetic and epigenetic changes in lung cancers, particularly microRNAs. Therapeutically, he is interested in understanding how better to target specific therapies to specific patients – i.e. understanding which patients will respond to which therapeutic maneuvers. Dr. Otterson has active collaborations within OSU, including in the Division of Cancer Genetics (Carlo Croce), the School of Public Health (Mary Ellen Wewers and Amy Ferketich), and the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (Patrick Nana-Sinkam). Outside of OSU, he works with investigators at the University of Minnesota, and also actively works with the Cancer and Leukemia Group B, having been National Principal Investigator on three studies through the Respiratory Committee.


George Simon, MD

George Simon, MD

Dr George Simon is Professor of Medicine and Section Chief, Translational Research; Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX. Dr Simon was previously Associate Professor of Medicine and Oncology. Dr. Simon is currently Associate Professor of Medicine and Oncology at the Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC. He also served as the Assistant Director of Clinical Investigation at the Hollings Cancer Center and is the Burtschy Family distinguished endowed chair in Cancer Research. Previously he served as the Director of the Thoracic Oncology Program, Department of Medical Oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. After earning his medical degree from the Christian Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana in Punjab, India, Dr. Simon completed residencies in internal medicine at the Christina Medical College and Hospital, Punjab, India and St. Joseph’s Hospital, Denver, CO, and a fellowship in medical oncology and hematology at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, CO. Previously, Dr. Simon has served as the director of the mesothelioma research program at the H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL. Prior to joining the H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Dr. Simon served as the Director of Clinical Investigation in the Division of Hemotology and Oncology at the Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO. Dr. Simon has served as a member of the NCCN Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer guidelines panel, American College of Chest Physician, Lung Cancer Guidelines committee and in the thoracic core committee of the South West Oncology Group. He currently serves in the Thoracic Core Committee of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group. Dr. Simon is an Ad Hoc reviewer for several panels of the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, and Department of Defense and also a reviewer for several journals including, Cancer Research, Clinical Cancer Research, Chest, Cancer, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Journal of Thoracic Oncology, and Indian Journal of Cancer. He is author of co-author of over 70 peer-reviewed research publications, 13 book chapters and over 65 abstracts.

Melanoma

David Fisher, MD

David Fisher, MD

Dr. Fisher is chief of the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Dermatology at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts (USA). He also serves as director of the MGH Cutaneous Biology Research Center and director of the Melanoma Center at MGH. Fisher’s research has focused on understanding the molecular and genetic events which underlie formation of melanoma as well as skin pigmentation. As a clinician, he has worked to translate these understandings into advances in diagnosis, treatment and prevention of human diseases related to the skin and associated disorders. A graduate of Swarthmore College with a degree in Biology and Chemistry, Fisher is also a concert cellist and graduated from the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. He received his PhD under doctors Henry Kunkel and Gunter Blobel at Rockefeller University and his Medical Degree at Cornell University Medical College. He carried out post-doctoral training with Dr. Phillip Sharp at MIT. Fisher’s specialty training in Medicine, Pediatrics, and Oncology were carried out at Harvard Medical School. He currently is the president of the Society for Melanoma Research.


Keith Flaherty, MD

Keith Flaherty, MD

Dr. Flaherty received a Bachelor of Science from Yale University and medical degree from Johns Hopkins University. He trained in internal medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and completed a fellowship in medical oncology at the University of Pennsylvania. He joined the faculty in the School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania as an Assistant Professor of Medicine and member of the Developmental Therapeutics Program in the Abramson Cancer Center in 2002. In 2009, Dr. Flaherty moved to Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School to serve as the Director of Developmental Therapeutics for the MGH Cancer Center. He was awarded a K23 grant from the NCI to investigate the inhibition of angiogenesis with targeted therapy combinations in melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. In addition to being principal investigator of numerous first-in-human clinical trials with novel targeted therapies, he is the principal investigator of two national, cooperative group trials: E2603, a phase III trial comparing sorafenib, carboplatin and paclitaxel to carboplatin and paclitaxel alone in patients with metastatic melanoma and E2804, a randomized phase II trial comparing combinations of anti-angiogenic agents in metastatic renal cell carcinoma. He served as principal investigator for the first-in-human clinical trials of the first prospectively developed selective BRAF inhibitors, RAF-265 and Zelboraf. Zelboraf has emerged as the most active single-agent therapy ever evaluated in metastatic melanoma patients, and is rapidly being tested in a phase III trial of which Dr. Flaherty serves as co-principal investigator. He is internationally known for expertise in clinical and translational research directed against signal transduction pathways in melanoma.


Marcus W. Bosenberg, MD, PhD

Marcus W. Bosenberg, MD, PhD

Marcus W. Bosenberg is an Associate Professor of Dermatology and Pathology at Yale University. He completed medical and graduate education at Cornell University and his clinical training in pathology and dermatopathology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Bosenberg’s research interests are focused on the genetics and cell biology of melanoma progression and metastasis. He has developed a series of conditional inducible mouse models of melanoma that have clarified the synergistic effects of particular genetic changes in human melanoma. These models are also being utilized to study the sequential steps required for clinically evident metastasis and how the immune system can be stimulated to produce effective anti-tumor responses. Using these models, he has defined a distinct melanoma cell subset that is uniformly capable of forming tumors following injection of single purified cells and from cells that only rarely form tumors. He is interested in studying how cancer cell heterogeneity is maintained and how heterogeneity affects responses to therapeutic intervention. He is also attempting to identify novel combination therapies that are effective in particular genetic or phenotypic subsets of melanoma.


Jeffrey E. Gershenwald, MD

Jeffrey E. Gershenwald, MD

Jeffrey E. Gershenwald, MD, FACS, is a Professor of Surgery in the Department of Surgical Oncology and a Professor in the Department of Cancer Biology at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) in Houston, Texas. Dr. Gershenwald received his undergraduate degree from Cornell University and his MD from Cornell University Medical College. After completing his general surgery residency at The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, Dr. Gershenwald completed a fellowship in Surgical Oncology at MDACC before joining the faculty there. Dr. Gershenwald holds numerous academic administrative appointments, including serving as Vice-Chair of the Melanoma Committee of the American Joint Committee for Cancer (AJCC) and on the Executive Council for the Society of Surgical Oncology. He is also a Co-Director of the Melanoma SPORE and Co-Director of the Melanoma Informatics, Tissue Resource, and Pathology Core, both at MDACC. Dr. Gershenwald’s research focuses on prognostic assessment in melanoma and molecular mechanisms of melanoma progression. Most recently, Dr. Gershenwald has been a founding member and Co-Chair of the Melanoma Disease Working Group of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. Dr. Gershenwald has published more than 130 articles in peer-reviewed journals, as well as more than 100 editorials, abstracts, invited articles, and other publications. His many honors include the Physician-Scientist Program Award from MDACC, an American Cancer Society Research Scholar Grant Award to examine the “Biology and Significance of Melanoma Lymphatic Metastasis” and, for the past 8 years, Dr. Gershenwald has been listed in America’s Best Doctors.


Meenhard Herlyn, DVM, DSc

Meenhard Herlyn, DVM, DSc

Dr. Herlyn is professor and chair of the Molecular and Cellular Oncogenesis Program at The Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, PA. He is also the Associated Director for Translational Research in the Cancer Center and Director of the Melanoma Research Center. He has been a cancer researcher since his arrival at Wistar in 1976 and has worked in melanoma research since 1977. His research focuses on the biological significance of growth factors and adhesion molecules in skin morphogenesis, transformation to melanoma, and melanoma growth, invasion and metastasis, using a variety of in vitro and in vivo models. He wants to know how a nevus develops in normal skin, when it becomes high risk for malignant transformation, and when and why dormant melanoma cells become activated, invading deep into the skin and spreading throughout the body. In recent years his laboratory has expanded to research on stem cells and their role in skin and skin disease development. A major part of the laboratory is pursuing therapeutic strategies that take into account the genetic and biologic signatures of melanomas. Dr. Herlyn has over 400 publications, 90% of which are in melanoma, with the others on basic biological mechanisms in cancer.


Harriet Kluger, MD

Harriet Kluger, MD

Dr Harriet Kluger was born in South Africa, and emigrated to Israel, where she obtained her MD from Tel Aviv University, graduating in 1993. Dr Kluger completed her training in Internal Medicine in the United States and is board certified in Medical Oncology. She has been at Yale since 1999, where she did her fellowship and is currently an Associate Professor of Medicine. Abundantly published for being so early in her medical academic career, she has served on multiple study sections and has received substantial grant support for the study of melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. Dr Kluger is currently designated an American Cancer Society Research Scholar. With three sons who are all passionate about soccer, she spends a lot of time at games, where she has developed productive collaborations with other investigators on the side-lines. Her current research interests focus on predictive biomarker development and early drug development for patients with melanoma and renal cell carcinoma.


Glenn Merlino, PhD

Glenn Merlino, PhD

Dr. Merlino’s career research contributions include the areas of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, oncogenic transformation, transcriptional regulation, cell cycle regulation, multiple drug resistance and genomic instability. Dr. Merlino was the first to report the amplification/rearrangement of the EGFR gene in human cancer and was among the first to show that growth factors could function in vivo as oncogenes using transgenic mouse models. Currently, Dr. Merlino and his colleagues in the Cancer Modeling Section are seeking to elucidate the complex molecular/genetic programs governing melanoma genesis and progression through development and analysis of GEM models of human cancer. Using a novel mouse melanoma model, Dr. Merlino provided the first experimental evidence supporting the notion that childhood sunburn is a critical melanoma risk factor. This model is being used to identify the molecular wiring of melanoma initiation by UV radiation, and to access the relative risks of exposure to UVA and UVB in sunlight. A translational goal is to use GEM models for preclinical studies aimed at studying residual metastatic disease and its resistance to therapeutics.


Katherine L. Nathanson, MD

Katherine L. Nathanson, MD

Dr. Katherine Nathanson received her BS in Biology with Honors from Haverford College and her MD from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. She then trained in Internal Medicine at the Beth Israel Hospital, Boston and did a fellowship in Genetics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. She is doubly boarded in Internal Medicine and Genetics. She completed her postdoctoral laboratory training with Dr. Barbara Weber in the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, focusing on breast cancer genetics. Dr. Nathanson has had a long-standing interest in the genetics of breast cancer and her studies in breast cancer have focused on characterizing BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in different patient populations; identifying genetic modifiers of penetrance in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers; examining both candidate modifiers of penetrance; and using linkage based methods to identify novel modifiers of penetrance. Dr. Nathanson’s current efforts continue these studies and have expanded to include characterization of breast cancer on a genomic level to identify both somatic and germline genetic changes important in breast cancer.


David Polsky, MD, PhD

David Polsky, MD, PhD

Dr. David Polsky received his MD and PhD from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, completed his medical internship at Montefiore Medical Center, his Dermatology training at NYU, and a post-doctoral fellowship in Molecular Pathology at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Dr. Polsky is currently a full-time physician-scientist at NYU with his research laboratory, clinical practice and teaching activities focused on melanoma and atypical nevi. He is currently an Associate Professor of Dermatology and Pathology, Director of the Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Director of the Melanoma/Skin Cancer Screening Program at NYU, and Director of the Dermatology Residency Training Program, the largest Dermatology training program in the United States. Dr. Polsky has been invited to speak at many national and international medical and scientific meetings, and has published numerous manuscripts and book chapters in top ranked medical and scientific journals such as Nature, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, and Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Polsky’s laboratory is focused on deregulation of growth control pathways in melanoma tumors, and identifying inherited genetic variations that increase an individual’s risk for developing melanoma. The overall goal his research is to translate the knowledge gained into new tools for melanoma risk assessment, prognosis and therapy.


Victor Prieto, MD, PhD, FACP

Victor Prieto, MD, PhD, FACP

Dr. Victor G. Prieto, MD, PhD is a tenured Professor of Pathology and Dermatology at the UT – M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX. Dr. Prieto came in 1991 to New York Hospital – Cornell University to conduct a research fellowship in Dermatopathology under the supervision of Dr. Scott McNutt. During that time he conducted research on immunohistochemistry of cutaneous neoplasms and participation of Langerhans in cutaneous eruptions. He then completed a residency in Anatomic Pathology (New York Hospital and MSKCC), and a fellowship in Dermatopathology again with Dr. Scott McNutt. After completing his Dermatopathology training in 1996 he joined Dr. Christopher R. Shea at Duke University as an Assistant Professor. In 1999, Dr. Prieto joined the departments of Pathology and Dermatology and became the director of Dermatopathology at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. Since then he has reached the level of full professor and has set up the Dermatopathology fellowship at his institution. During 3 years he was the Medical Director of the Pathology Department. Dr. Prieto’s main research interests are adnexal, mesenchymal, and particularly melanocytic lesions, in particular the examination of sentinel lymph nodes.


Antoni Ribas, MD

Antoni Ribas, MD

Dr. Ribas is Associate Professor of Medicine and Surgery at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). He was trained at the University of Barcelona, Spain, with postdoctoral research and clinical fellowship at UCLA. He is the Director of the Tumor Immunology Program at the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center (JCCC), a permanent committee member of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) grant review panels and an elected member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation (ASCI). Dr. Ribas is a physician-scientist conducting laboratory and clinical research focused in malignant melanoma, including adoptive cell transfer with T cell receptor (TCR) engineered lymphocytes, anti-CTLA4 antibodies, targeted therapies for melanoma oncogenes and nanoparticle-siRNA.


Lynn M. Schuchter, MD

Lynn M. Schuchter, MD

Lynn M. Schuchter, MD is a Professor of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Chief of the Division of Hematology and Oncology in the Department of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Schuchter has been on the faculty at Penn since 1989 after completing her medical oncology training at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Schuchter is a recognized expert in the field of melanoma and an experienced investigator in the development and conduct of melanoma clinical trials. She has extensive experience in melanoma translational research, and thus serves as an important link between basic scientists and clinical investigators. She the leader of the Melanoma and Cutaneous Malignancies Program at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania. She has been the principal investigator of numerous phase I, phase II, and phase III melanoma clinical trials. She is on board of the Melanoma Research Foundation where she is also the co- chair of the scientific advisory committee. The Melanoma Research Foundation is a nationwide organization that is the largest advocacy group for this disease. She also serves on the ASCO Board of Directors and is the editor of the melanoma section for ASCO’s Cancer.net. Dr. Schuchter has authored numerous articles and book chapters on melanoma. As a clinician caring for patients with all stages of melanoma, she is dedicated to the development of new therapies for patients with melanoma.

Prostate Cancer

E. David Crawford, MD

E. David Crawford, MD

E. David Crawford is the distinguished Professor of Surgery, Urology, and Radiation Oncology, the Head of the Section of Urologic Oncology at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Chairman of the Prostate Conditions Education Council and founder of Bingham International Center for the 3D Diagnosis and Treatment of Prostate Cancer. Dr. Crawford received his medical degree from the University of Cincinnati. His postgraduate training included an internship and residency in urology at the Good Samaritan Hospital in Cincinnati. He completed a genitourinary cancer fellowship at the University of California Medical Center in Los Angeles. Dr. Crawford is an internationally-recognized expert in benign prostate hypertrophy, urologic cancers, and, in particular, prostate cancer. The recipient of more than 69 research grants, he has conducted research in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer, metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate, hormone refractory prostate cancer, and other areas of urological infections and malignancies. He has authored or coauthored more than 450 articles in such journals as Urology, The New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of Urology and the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. He has published five textbooks and authored more than 50 book chapters, and is an editorial reviewer or consultant for Urology, Journal of Urology, The New England Journal of Medicine, Cancer and the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Crawford is an active member of many national and international organizations, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Urological Association (AUA) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Crawfords involvement in the national prostate cancer arena has been widely recognized and he has received many honors and awards, including a Freddie Award at the AMA International Health and Medical Film Competition for the program ITV: The Cutting Edge Medical Report (Prostate Cancer: Understanding, Diagnosing, and Defeating). He has been recognized as one of the Best Doctors in America, one of the Best Cancer Doctors, one of the Top 20 Urologists in the Country and was selected as the Best Healthcare Provider in the Denver Metro region.


Charles L. Bennett, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.P.

Charles L. Bennett, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.P.

Charles L. Bennett, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.P., is a hematologist and oncologist whose research focuses on preventing adverse drug events and improving drug safety. An international expert in his field, Bennett was recruited in Spring 2010 as the new endowed chair of the South Carolina Center for Economic Excellence (CoEE) in Medication Safety and Efficacy and the Josie P and Frank M Fletcher Professor of Pharmacy at the University of South Carolina (USC) campus of the South Carolina College of Pharmacy. The Medication Safety and Efficacy program which Bennett leads works to prevent adverse drug effects (ADEs) and to improve drug safety. The Center was created in 2005 to study the effects of prescription and over-the-counter medications, particularly on children and the elderly. The CoEE also is focused on education and outreach to health care professionals and the general public through the Doris Levkoff Meddin Medication Safety Education Program. South Carolina is the first and only state to endow a program in pharmaceutical safety. Dr. Bennett, along with his team at the Medication Safety and Efficacy CoEE, will be developing technology that has high likelihood of commercialization, will look for ways to make drug information more consumer-friendly, and will create new training tools for health care providers.

 

Michael K. Brawer, MD

Michael K. Brawer, MD

Michael K. Brawer, MD is Vice President Medical Affairs, Urology, Myriad Genetics Laboratories.  Dr. Brawer joins Myriad from GTx inc where he served as Executive Director Medical Affairs and Clinical Development (2009-2012).  Prior to this he was Chief Medical Officer, Tokai Pharmaceuticals(2007-2009) From 2006–2007, Dr. Brawer was Interim Chief Medical Officer at Threshold Pharmaceuticals. In 1998, he was a founder of the Northwest Prostate Institute, a community hospital focused on clinical practice, community outreach, basic and clinical research and medical education, and served as Director until 2007. From 1986–1998, he held various academic appointments first at the University of Arizona and then at the University of Washington where he was Professor of Urology and Adjunct Professor of Pathology. Dr. Brawer has published more than 200 scientific papers, 10 books and 74 book chapters and is the recipient of 28 peer review competitive grants. In 1998, the American Urological Association bestowed upon him the Gold Cystoscope, given annually to a urologist distinguished by outstanding contributions to the profession within 10 years of completion of residency training. Dr. Brawer received his bachelor and medical degrees from the University of California, Los Angeles, where he also completed a fellowship in pathology, and completed his residency in urology at Stanford University Medical Center, where from 1985–1986 he was Chief Resident, Urology.

Robert Dreicer, M.D., M.S., FACP, FASCO

Robert Dreicer, M.D., M.S., FACP, FASCO

Dr. Dreicer is Chair of the Department of Solid Tumor Oncology at the Cleveland Clinic,  a Professor of Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine and Deputy Associate Director for Clinical Research for the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Dreicer is board certified in internal medicine and medical oncology. His areas of specialization are the management of genitourinary malignancies and the design and conduct of clinical trials.  Dr. Dreicer received his B.S. degree at Colorado State University, his MS degree at the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences,  and his M.D. from the University of Texas Medical School at Houston. His internal medicine residency was at Indiana University, his medical oncology fellowship at the University of Wisconsin Clinical Cancer Center in Madison, Wisconsin. He is the Co-Chair of NCI GU Steering committee and chair of the Bladder Subcommittee of ECOG. He has chaired the Department of Defense Prostate Cancer Integration Panel and the Steering Committee of ASCO’s 2008 GU Oncology meeting. He is, an Associate Editor of Urology, a member of the editorial board of New England Journal of Medicine’s Journal Watch Hematology/Oncology and a member of the ABIM Subspecialty Board on Medical Oncology.


Robert H. Getzenberg, Ph.D.

Robert H. Getzenberg, Ph.D.

Robert H. Getzenberg, Ph.D. is the Director of Strategic Clinical Affairs at GTx Inc.  Previously, he was Director of Research of the James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute and Professor of Urology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  Dr. Getzenberg received his Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1992.  Dr. Getzenberg then completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Yale University School of Medicine.  Dr. Getzenberg is the recipient of a number of awards including the 2000 University of Pittsburgh chancellor’s Distinguished Research Award and was selected as one of the “40 under 40” by Pittsburgh Magazine.  Dr. Getzenberg has been the recipient of a number of grants from the National institutes of Health and other agencies and foundations.  Dr. Getzenberg has served in a number of international leadership positions and has authored a large number of manuscripts and book chapters in the field.

Philip Kantoff, MD

Philip Kantoff, MD

Philip Kantoff, MD, is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.  He is also the Chief Clinical Research Officer and Chief of the Division of Solid Tumor Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. He is the Leader of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center Prostate Cancer Program and Director of the prostate cancer Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE).

Dr. Kantoff is a clinical and translational researcher.  He is the principal investigator of a laboratory whose primary focus has been on the genetics and genetic epidemiology of prostate cancer, resistance mechanisms to hormone therapy, and biomarkers relevant as potential prognostic markers and therapeutic targets. His clinical research includes clinical trials, outcomes, and laboratory-based correlative science research.

An expert in genitourinary cancers, Dr. Kantoff is the lead editor of the comprehensive text on prostate cancer, “Prostate Cancer: Principles and Practice,” published by Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, and authored a layperson’s self-help book on prostate cancer, “Prostate Cancer: A Family Consultation,” published by Houghton Mifflin. He has also authored over 300 articles in peer-reviewed publications such as Cell , Science, Nature,  JAMA,  The New England Journal of Medicine and. Journal of Clinical Oncology

Dr. Kantoff graduated from Brown University Medical School in Providence, Rhode Island. After completing his internship and residency in internal medicine at New York University Hospital and Bellevue Hospital, both in New York, New York, he spent 4 years at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, conducting research in gene therapy.


M. Scott Lucia, M.D.

M. Scott Lucia, M.D.

M. Scott Lucia, M.D. is currently Professor and Vice Chair of Anatomic Pathology in the Department of Pathology.  He also serves as Director of the Prostate Cancer Research Laboratories within the Department of Pathology, and as Director of the UCAMC Biorepository Core Facility.  Dr. Lucia received his M.D. from the University of Colorado School of Medicine in 1988.  He completed his internship and residency in pathology at the University of Colorado in 1993.  He was a research fellow in the Laboratory of Chemoprevention at the National Institutes of Health from 1993-1995 before returning to Colorado in 1995.  He is board-certified in anatomic and clinical pathology and subspecializes in genitourinary and renal pathology.  Dr. Lucia serves on several campus committees including the UC School of Medicine Infrastructure Subcommittee of the Research Task Force and the Oncology Strategic Oversight Committee.  Dr. Lucia regularly participates in the teaching of medical students as a part of the IDPT 5005 course and CHA/PA program.  He has received 13 Excellence in Teaching Awards voted on by the medical students and 3 Department of Pathology Summit Awards for Excellence in Teaching and the Education of Pathologists.  Dr. Lucia has also been listed in the Best Doctors in America® database since 2009.

Daniel P. Petrylak, MD

Daniel P. Petrylak, MD

Daniel P. Petrylak, MD completed his medical degree at Case Western Reserve University School of medicine , and completed his internal medicine residency at Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Jacobi Medical center and fellowship at Memorial SloanKettering cancer center. He is currently Director of Genitourinary Oncology, and Co Director of the  Signal Transduction Program at Yale University Cancer Center.

Dr. Petrylak  is involved in clinical trials research on a local,  national, and international level.   He is the head of the advanced bladder subcommittee in the Southwest Oncology Group Genitourinary Committee. Dr. Petrylak served as PI or Co PI on 7 Southwest Oncology Group Protocols. Most notably, he served as the PI for a randomized trial comparing docetaxel and estramustine to mitoxantrone and prednisone in men with hormone refractory prostate cancer. This trial was one of two studies that demonstrated a survival benefit for docetaxel-based therapy in men with advanced prostate cancer. This trial supported the approval of docetaxel for hormone refractory prostate cancer by the FDA.  He also help to design and served as principal investigator for the SPARC trial, an international registration trial evaluating the activity of satraplatin as a second line therapy for hormone refractory prostate cancer.

Dr. Petrylak is a recognized international leader in the field. He has served on the program committee for the annual meetings of the American Urological Association (2003-11) as well as for the American Society of Clinical Oncology (1995-7, 2001-3). He also has served as a committee member for the Devices and Immunolgicals section of the Food and Drug Administration. He has published extensively, in the New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, as well as Cancer Research and Clinical Cancer Research.


Kenneth J. Pienta, M.D.

Kenneth J. Pienta, M.D.

Dr. Pienta has international expertise in the development of novel chemotherapeutic programs for prostate cancer. Dr. Pienta has championed the concept that translational research is often best accomplished by multi-disciplinary teams of scientists and clinicians. The success of these endeavors led to the receipt of the 2007 first annual American Association for Cancer Research Team Science Award. He is the author of more than 300 peer-reviewed articles, and been the principle investigator on numerous local and national clinical trials. Throughout his career, Dr. Pienta has effectively mentored over 40 students, residents and fellows to successful careers in medicine.

Effective March 1, 2013, Dr. Pienta will be joining the faculty of Johns Hopkins Hospital, School of Medicine as The Donald S. Coffey Professor of Urology,   Director, of the Brady Urological Institute.  Dr. Pienta will be leaving his current position as the Associate Vice President for Research, Health Sciences, and Director of Experimental Therapeutics for the Michigan Center for Translational Pathology.


Jack A Schalken, PhD

Jack A Schalken, PhD

Jack A Schalken PhD (53) was trained as biochemist at the Radboud University Nijmegen, where he also obtained his PhD degree (1987). He did his post doc with Dr John T Isaacs at Johns Hopkins Hospital (Baltimore, MD). Since then he is director of urological research at the Radboud University Medical Center. In 1996 Dr Schalken was appointed as full professor of experimental oncology at the University of Utrecht. Since 2001 he is professor of experimental urology at the Radboud University (Nijmegen).

His research has a strong translational component, i.e. conducting life sciences research to accelerate healthcare outcomes, specific themes

  • Unravelling the mechanism of GU cancer invasion/cadherin switching
  • Molecular diagnostics of prostate cancer; PCA3.
  • Cancer stem/initiating cells
  • Targeted therapy in GU cancer

Ralph W. de Vere White, MD

Ralph W. de Vere White, MD

Ralph W. de Vere White is associate dean for cancer programs at UC Davis School of Medicine and Medical Center. He is director of the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, and a Distinguished Professor of the Department of Urology.

Dr. de Vere White is the Director of the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center and, he is the Associate Dean of Cancer Programs as well as a Distinguished Professor of Urology at the University of California, Davis.  Dr. de Vere White has a proven record in leading as well as collaborating on NIH, DOD and Cooperative Group research projects. Specifically, he was the PI of the UC Davis P01 program project in prostate cancer. This group eventually evolved into the UC Davis CCSG Prostate Cancer Program (05), the only organ site of the UCD NCI funded CCSG.  In addition, he was the founding PI of the UC Davis Urology Cancer Outreach Program (UCOP) as well as founder of the Genitourinary (GU) Tumor Biology Committee of the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG).

His individual research focuus is in the area of prostate and bladder cancer, for which he has received continual NCI funding since 1985. His research is focused on the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in prostate cancer. Dr. de Vere White has a demonstrated record of successful and productive leadership as well as a strong history of facilitating research collaborations in the area of clinical cancer research and prostate cancer.

Pan-Cancer

Razelle Kurzrock, MD

Razelle Kurzrock, MD

Dr. Razelle Kurzrock is known for developing one of the largest and best phase 1 clinical trials programs in the nation while at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. A central theme of that program was the personalized medicine strategy, embodied in a protocol called PREDICT for Profile-related Evidence Determining Individualized Cancer Therapy. This approach utilized advanced molecular technologies to match patients with targeted cancer treatment that optimized chances for response.

At Moores Cancer Center, Dr. Kurzrock’s charge is broad, including not just growing and innovating the Center’s clinical trials program, but also heading its newly established Center for Personalized Therapy. As a physician-scientist, she brings extraordinary expertise and experience in clinical research, business operations, regulatory operations, financial and budget planning, and administrative oversight, in addition to her world-recognized work in translational science. Dr. Kurzrock is also Vice Chief of the Hematology-Oncology Division in the UC San Diego School of Medicine.

Dr. Kurzrock received her MD degree from the University of Toronto and has about 450 peer-reviewed publications and a uniquely strong record of competitive grant funding within the setting of phase I program building. She has been the principal investigator of the National Cancer Institute U01 Phase I Studies of Targeted Anti-Cancer Agents.


Ignacio Garrido-Laguna, MD

Ignacio Garrido-Laguna, MD

Ignacio Garrido-Laguna, MD is an assistant professor of oncology at the University of Utah School of Medicine and a Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) investigator. At HCI, he sees patients with gastrointestinal cancers and patients enrolled in Phase 1 trials.  His primary research interest is pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.  His work in patient derived xenografts has shown that the stroma is involved in resistance to gemcitabine.  At HCI, Ignacio is part of an effort to identify druggable genetic aberrations in patients referred to their phase 1 unit.  The hypothesis is that matching patients to drugs targeting genetic aberrations present in their tumors may increase response to targeted therapies.  Ignacio’s work has shown that coactivation of MAPK pathway in patients with colorectal cancer harboring PIK3CA mutations may contribute to resistance to PI3K/mTOR inhibitors in this disease.  Ignacio received his medical degree from the School of Medicine of Universidad de Navarra in Pamplona (Spain). He finished his internship and residency in medical oncology at Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre in Madrid, Spain. He completed his training with a postdoctoral fellowship in the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins and a clinical fellowship in the Phase I program at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.


Dr. Filip Janku, MD, PhD

Dr. Filip Janku, MD, PhD

Dr. Filip Janku, MD, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics (Phase I Program) at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Janku is a principal investigator for numerous phase I protocols, most of which involve novel, targeted agents, some of those being first-in-human studies. Dr. Janku received multiple awards for his research efforts, including four Merit Awards from ASCO as well as an American Association for Cancer Research Scholar-in-Training Award. Dr. Janku has published over 40 articles in highly-respected, peer-reviewed journals. Dr. Janku’s academic research interests focus on poof-of-concept clinical trials that possess a pivotal correlative component especially those involving autophagy, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and tumor molecular profiling.


Javier Munoz, MD

Javier Munoz, MD

Dr. Munoz specializes in treating hematological malignancies or blood cancers, particularly lymphomas.

He earned his medical degree at Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia in Peru. Dr. Munoz completed his residency and hematology-oncology fellowship at Henry Ford Health System in Michigan before completing an investigational cancer therapeutics fellowship at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

His interests include molecular heterogeneity of lymphomas, and subclassification of specific lymphoma subtypes amenable to targeted treatment.

He is triple board certified in internal medicine, hematology and medical oncology and has published in the major journals within his field as Blood, the American Journal of Hematology, Nature Reviews and JAMA.


Jordi Rodon, MD

Jordi Rodon, MD

Jordi Rodon is attending physician at the Medical Oncology department of Vall d´Hebron University Hospital and Clinical Coordinator of the Molecular Therapies Research Unit (UITM).

He went to Medical School at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona-Vall d´Hebron University Hospital, and got his specialization in Medical Oncology at the Catalan Institute of Oncology (Institut Català d’Oncologia). He has been Research fellow at the Advanced Drug Development Fellowship program at the Institute For Drug Development in San Antonio, Texas, and Senior Research fellow at the Investigational Cancer Therapeutics Department at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas.

He joined the Medical Oncology Department in 2008 and has been principal investigator or co-investigator in more than 80 phase I trials. At Vall d´Hebron, he coordinates the phase I program and the traslational research at UITM, as well as projects in Personalized Oncoligy, being member of  Stand-up-to-cancer, Eurocan and WIN Consortium.


Richard Schwab, MD

Richard Schwab, MD

Dr. Schwab is an Associate Professor of Medicine and the Moores Cancer Center Biorepository co-Director at UC San Diego.  He is board certified in Hematology and Medical Oncology.  His research is focused on biomarkers to diagnose and refine the treatment of cancer.  His current projects include identification of clinically significant genetic changes in breast cancer and development of anti-progesterones to treat early stage breast cancer.

Using next generation sequencing and unique tumor specimens collected by the cancer center Biorepository, he is working to find novel DNA and RNA changes with prognostic or treatment predictive utility.

Additionally Dr. Schwab has opened an investigator IND of the anti-progesterone mifepristone.  Using a biomarker based approach he hopes to revive and accelerate the development of anti-progesterone therapy for breast cancer.

In support of these and other biomarker studies Dr. Schwab co-directs a biorepository to prospectively collect de-identified blood, urine and tumor specimens.  This resource has a series of key features to maximize its future utility; (1) specimens are associated with detailed clinical data that is regularly updated, (2) samples are stored as small volume aliquots at –80 degrees Celsius to prevent freeze/thaw damage and (3) subjects are consented for germ line DNA sequencing.


Vivek Subbiah, MD

Vivek Subbiah, MD

Vivek Subbiah, MD is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics (A Phase 1 Program), Division of Cancer Medicine, from July 2012 at The University of MD Anderson Cancer Center. After completing his medical school in India at Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, he completed a combined residency in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics at Case Western Reserve University, MetroHealth, Cleveland Ohio.   Dr. Subbiah has a unique training background as he is one of the few physicians in the nation/world to have training in oncology in both adults and children. He is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Pediatrics and has completed fellowships in both adult and pediatric oncology at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. There are few good programs in the country that address the needs of the approximately 72,000 adolescents and young adults (AYA) (15-39 age group) diagnosed with cancer every year in the United States. According to the report of the AYA Oncology Progress Review Group of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) the outcomes of these patients compared with younger and older age groups, has seen little or no improvement in cancer survival rates for decades. Dr. Subbiah has a great interest in improving outcomes in adolescents and young adults with malignancies as well as deciphering mechanisms of treatment response and resistance by studying young patients with unusually dramatic responses. These young people, and their parents and families, are tremendously motivated to find the best treatment options.  Dr. Subbiah has been working closely with colleagues in Cancer Medicine and Pediatrics to develop novel treatment methods including molecularly targeted therapies, radiopharmaceutical studies and immunotherapeutic strategies to improve the outcomes of AYA with cancer. In addition, by using cutting-edge molecular profiling and the large portfolio of targeted drugs, he is positioning to lead the way in identifying new treatments for the atypical cancers that these young people develop.  He is providing an unmatched opportunity to fulfill an unmet need in treating AYA who suffer from cancer. His research interests include adolescent and young adult oncology, phase 1 trials – drug development (molecularly targeted therapy, radiopharmaceutical studies and immunotherapeutic studies), and clinical trials with molecularly targeted agents in targetable rare diseases (eg, translocation positive sarcomas, NF1, NF2). He also has a passion for N=1 studies in cancer patients that have dramatic responses to therapies by in depth analysis through next generation sequencing, morphoproteomics, and other cutting edge methods for analysis of response/ resistance mechanisms.

Leukemia

Fred Appelbaum, MD

Fred Appelbaum, MD

Frederick R. Appelbaum, MD, is Director of the Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Head of Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, and President and Executive Director of the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. He is a diplomat on the American Boards of Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology, and is past chair of the Board of Scientific Advisors of the National Cancer Institute. Additionally, he has been a board member of a number of scientific societies, including the American Society of Hematology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and is Chair of the Leukemia Committee of the Southwest Oncology Group. Dr. Appelbaum served two terms as Associate Editor for Blood and also serves on the Editorial Boards of numerous scientific journals. Dr. Appelbaum is Head of the Clinical Transplant Research Program in the FHCRC/University of Washington Cancer Consortium and Principal Investigator on several National Institutes of Health grants. He is the author of over 800 scientific articles and was the lead author on the first paper to describe the successful use of autologous marrow transplantation. Dr. Appelbaum’s current areas of research interests center on the biology and treatment of hematologic malignancies.


Jerald P. Radich, MD

Jerald P Radich MD

Dr. Jerald Radich is a Member of the Clinical Research Division and Director the Molecular Oncology Lab at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and Professor of Medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine. He is Chair of the Leukemia Translational Medicine Committee of the Southwest Oncology Group,  co-chair of the NCI/NIH Leukemia Steering Committee, and is on the Board of Scientific Counselors, NIH Genome Research Institute.  He belong to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and the EuroLeukemiaNet (ELN) CML committees, and is on the Scientific Board of the International CML Foundation. Dr. Radich’s laboratory work centers on the molecular biology of response, resistance, and progression in adult and chronic leukemia.



Guido Marcucci MD

Gail J. Roboz, MD

Gail J. Roboz, MD

Gail J. Roboz, M.D. is Associate Professor of Medicine and Director of the Leukemia Program at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University and the New York Presbyterian Hospital in New York City.

Dr. Roboz graduated summa cum laude from Yale University and received her medical degree from The Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, where she was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society and achieved the highest academic standing in the graduating class.  She completed Internship in internal medicine at The Beth Israel Hospital in Boston and Residency in internal medicine at the New York Presbyterian Hospital.  Dr. Roboz was a Fellow in hematology and medical oncology at Weill Cornell/New York-Presbyterian Hospital and is board-certified in both specialties. She is a member of the American Society of Hematology and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.  Her research interests are in developmental therapeutics for acute leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome and myeloproliferative disorders.  Dr. Roboz is the principal investigator on investigator-initiated and industry-sponsored clinical trials in these areas and has authored or coauthored many manuscripts and abstracts.  She sits on the editorial boards of and acts as a reviewer for several journals, and has played an active role as a speaker and panelist at numerous regional, national and international conferences.  Dr. Roboz also serves on the Medical Advisory Board of the Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation.